The Artistic Process

Mynds-i - Artistic Process-In-Camera Inverted Double Exposures

Photographer Ginny Fobert experiments with many different photographic and post-processing techniques. This most difficult process involves taking two exposures in camera, with the second exposure taken with the camera upside down. Post processing involves removing colour and adjusting highlights and shadows to expose the ghosty shadows of the two exposures.

 

Mynds-i - Artistic Process- Image Stacking

Unique photographs have been created by stacking and blending hundreds of individual shots together during the processing phase. Each frame has an exposure of a few seconds, and photos are captured over the course of a few hours. While some subjects barely move others in the same shot are captured differently in each frame creating a unique view of time.

 

Mynds-i Artistic Process-Impressionist Photos

Mynd’s i artist Ginny loves to experiment with the camera in ways such as Intentional Camera Movement (ICM). The ICM technique involves quickly moving the camera while taking a slightly longer exposure. The environment, colours, light and your imagination will determine the the final outcome.

 

Mynds-i - Artistic Process- Frozen Flowers

The unexpected freezing of flowers into blocks of ice created an incredible subject for Ginny Fobert’s creative photography. The scientific theory is that as the water freezes it expands. As it expands it squeezes the oxygen out of the flowers, thus leaving behind frozen trails of bubbles.

 

Mynds-i - Artistic Process-Blurred Lines

An evening of sifting through numerous travel photos and wondering what to do with them all, resulted in this creative series called 'BLURRED LINES'. Seven to ten photos, sometime the same photo repeatedly, and more often seven to ten different photos, are processed on top of each other. Varying the opacity of segments throughout give the impression of business and liveliness of everyday life.

 

Mynds-i - Artistic Process- Oil Painting

What better way for a photograph to look like art than to 'oil paint' it on the computer. Choosing a brush enhances the texture already on the photograph, thus making it look as it it has been created with oil paints.

 Mynds-i - Artistic Process-Fine Art in Nature

Although not considering herself a nature photographer Ginny enjoys getting outside and enjoying the natural beauty of her surroundings. When you take a deep breath and remain still the curious, creative eye can see patterns, colours and unique life in an outdoor setting.